Echinaforce JR: Product Review

My little man is 4 years old now and he’s quickly learning that winter brings more than just snowmen, sledding, and skiing.

Last year he got sick. Not just once but a handful of times. It seemed like our house just continued to pass along colds and cases of flu all winter season. It wasn’t a great winter.

This year we are optimistic about change. He’s one year older, he has now been in preschool for one school term so hopefully, he’s slightly more immune to every single illness. But this year I decided to try something different.

My husband and I both take our daily vitamins but we also take echinacea which we have found to be very helpful during the cold season. So I did a little research and found out that a company does, in fact, make echinacea for young ones!

A. Vogel makes ‘Echinaforce Junior’ a cole & flu chewable tablet for prevention and treatment. It helps to prevent and relieve the symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections (common cold and flu) and shorten their duration. It is recommended for children ages 2 and up. Bonus it contains no dairy and or wheat.

This is our first winter season we have decided to try it out and see if it works for my son. So far, he asks to take it every morning with his regular vitamin and he has no problem taking it. Check back with me after the cold and flu season has come and gone, when I will have more solid evidence but I can say that since September when winter really does begin in Calgary, he has yet to have a cold.

Like all of you, I just want the best for my kids, so I urge you to take a look and see if this might be an option for you in the fight to keep your little ones healthy this winter season! We handed it out at our recent Travelling Tot programs and I am not sure who was happier to receive it. Parents or the kids who thought it was a treat!

For more information on A.Vogel and ‘Echinaforce Junior’ you can check them out below.

https://www.avogel.ca/en/

Warrior Label

Meet Venesa Wheatley. She is the creator of @Warrior Label, a brand of apparel designed to acknowledge, honor and celebrate warriors.

In 2015, when Venesa was almost 39 weeks pregnant she and her husband lost their daughter, Kate, to stillbirth. Venesa found in those early days that she really needed to be truly seen and heard; that she needed to share her story in order to process her loss and honor her daughter’s life. 4 years later, her need to be acknowledged for her story hasn’t changed, but where she once was so consumed by grief, she now feels stronger than ever for what she has gone through. She feels like a WARRIOR.

In her going through her own struggle, it also made Venesa acutely aware of other people’s struggles and their capacity for resiliency. She believes that there are millions of warriors out there, each with their own story, and feels they need to be both acknowledged and celebrated. She does this through the thoughtful designs of their apparel and in an on-line community she is establishing. 

When she’s not busy building Warrior Label, Venesa is working part-time (both as an HR professional and a substitute teacher), volunteering in the pregnancy and infant loss community, and being an awesome mom to their 2 living children. Warrior Label is a brand of apparel designed to acknowledge, honour, and celebrate all warriors, no matter where they are in their journey. In choosing fabric that warms and envelops the body, to creating designs that resonate with those who are warrior-ing on through their struggle, compassion, care and acknowledgement are infused in every part of their brand.

Warrior Brand also gives back 10% of their profits to charities that provide support to individuals and families going through adversity. To learn more about their apparel and how they support worthy charities head to their website here.

Five RESP Myths Busted!

Although Registered Education Savings Plans (RESPs) have been available since the early 1970s there are still some lingering myths and confusion for people exploring this investment tool. This blog will help clarify how RESPs work and address some persistent myths in order to make choosing the right RESP for your family less perplexing.

An RESP is a powerful savings tool designed to help families save for their child’s education. Similar to the Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSP) and Tax Frees Savings Account (TSFA), the investments within an RESP grow tax free but that is where the similarity ends.

Only an RESP is eligible for government grants which truly make them the best way to save for post-secondary education. The Canada Education Savings Grant can contribute up to $7,200 to your child’s future and depending on your financial situation and province, other education grants may be available and can add even more to your savings.

When the time comes for your child to withdraw from the RESP, known as an Educational Assistance Payment, the earned income and grants are taxable to the beneficiary, which typically means a minimal amount.

Let’s bust some of those persistent RESP misconceptions!

Myth 1: Setting Up an RESP Should Be Free

An RESP is an investment tool, so while individuals can certainly set up and manage their RESPs for their beneficiaries on their own, there will always be costs involved. At the minimum, there may be annual fees along with commission fees that must be paid if you buy or sell investments within the product.

Many families choose to work with organizations that manage the portfolio of investments on their behalf. Knowledge First Financial works with leading portfolio managers who actively manage low-risk investments to provide steady growth over the long term. “Keep in mind that all investments have costs, such as fees to cover portfolio management and administration.”

There is one important exception available for modest-income families who open an RESP to access the Canada Learning Bond. For families that qualify, the Canadian government provides an initial grant and helps cover the costs of setting up the RESP.

Myth 2: Only Parents and Grandparents Can Set Up an RESP

With an individual plan, like the Flex First Plan from Knowledge First Financial, the beneficiary of an RESP does not have to be related to you. There are no restrictions who the beneficiary is or how old they are — you can even set up an RESP under your own name.

Myth 3: RESPs Cannot Be Shared Among Family Members

If the beneficiary chooses not to continue their education after high school, another beneficiary can be chosen. An individual RESP provides the greatest flexibility in choosing who the beneficiary is.

One thing to keep in mind when changing the beneficiary is the lifetime limit of $50,000. Coordinating with an RESP expert can ensure that your contributions and benefits are maximized for your students/beneficiaries.

Myth 4: Accessing My Child’s RESP Will Be Cumbersome

Your contributions are always available to be returned to you, tax-free. To access the grants, grant income and contribution income in your plan, the process may differ between RESP providers. At minimum they are required to ask for proof of enrolment in a qualifying program in order to withdraw the income in your plan. At Knowledge First Financial, we want to make the process easy and memorable by enabling customers and students to request funds online, offering tutorials and web chat customer service to answer any questions.

Myth 5: If My Child Decides Not to Attend College We Lose Our Savings

The money contributed to your RESP can be withdrawn any time as a Post-Secondary Education payment. If your child is not attending a qualified program at that time, the grants must be returned to the government. Investment earnings can be withdrawn as an Accumulated Income Payment or transferred to your or your spouse’s RRSP if there is contribution room available, provided your plan meets certain conditions specified under tax regulations. While you won’t lose your savings, it’s always best to speak with an RESP expert to understand your options and the financial considerations.

If your child decides not to head directly into college or university after completing high school, there is no need for concern. Beneficiaries have up to 35 years to use their RESP money, which can be used to cover the cost of a number of post-secondary educational programs, including college, university, apprenticeships, trade schools, as well as part-time studies. That means if your child later chooses to change careers or upgrade skills, those funds will still be available through their RESP.

If you would like more information or to set up a free consultation contact me at Karen.Wallace@KFF.ca

How to Understand Your Credit Rating and Credit Score

Knowledge First Financial
Unless you can afford to pay for everything in cash, you’ll need to borrow money at some point. That’s when a good credit score comes in handy. By maintaining a good credit score, you’ll pay less in interest and have more money to contribute to your child’s RESP.
Your credit score is made up of three main parts: credit history, credit report and credit score. Your credit history is like your resumé; it has a history of any time you’ve borrowed money. Your credit report is a yearly recap of your credit history. Your credit score is the number that lenders care so much about. Credit scores usually fall between 300 (lowest) and 900 (highest).
Understanding Your Credit Score
Your credit score is made up of five main factors you’ll want to understand in order to maximize it.
1. Payment History
Your payment history has the biggest influence on your overall credit score. Paying any money you’ve borrowed on time can go a long way in maintaining a good credit score. However, missing payments or paying them late can hurt it. If you do it too often, it can cause your credit score to plummet. By making at least the minimum payment, you can protect your credit score.
2. Total Available Credit
Your total available credit is as the name suggests how much credit you have at your disposal. To calculate your total available credit, take your total credit limits of all your credit accounts minus the total of all your outstanding balances.
Ideally, you’ll want to be using 35 percent or less of your total available credit. Using 35 percent or less of your total available credit shouldn’t impact your credit score. However, when you start using 50 percent or more, that’s when it can lead to your credit score dropping, as lenders tend to worry that you’re getting in over your head.
3. How Many Credit Inquiries
The number of credit inquiries can also impact your credit score. When it comes to credit inquiries, not all credit inquiries are created equal.
There are two types of credit inquiries: soft and hard. Soft inquiries don’t affect your credit score like checking your own credit. Meanwhile, hard inquiries like applying for a mortgage or credit card do. You want to limit the number of hard inquiries to protect your credit score. You can do that by only applying for credit that you truly intend to use.
4. Credit Types
Having just one type of credit like a credit card can hurt your credit score. You want to have a mix of credit. Besides just a credit card, try to have at least one other credit type like a mortgage, line of credit or loan. Just make sure you use any credit that you take out responsibly, otherwise it could hurt, not help your credit score.
5. Length of Credit History
Before a lender will grant you credit, they want to see that you have a track record of using credit in a responsible way. Your credit history goes a long way in demonstrating to a lender you can use credit responsibly over the long-term. The simplest ways you can demonstrate a good credit history is by always making payments on time.
Sometimes people close accounts because they’re no longer using them. However, as long as you’re not paying an annual fee, it’s worthwhile to keep a credit account like a credit card open if you’ve had it for a long time, otherwise you could cause your credit score to fall if you close it.
Karen Wallace
Sales Representative
See what our customers are saying about us www.knowledgefirstfinancialreviews.ca

RESPs vs. TFSAs: What’s the Best Place to Save for Your Child’s Post-Secondary Education?

As a parent, you want what’s best for your child. You do that by helping your children in many ways. You teach them how to ride a bike, attend their school recitals and help them save for post-secondary education. While all of these can be considered important life experiences, the last one can seem daunting. Thankfully, you’re not alone.
There are two popular ways to save towards your child’s post-secondary education costs: the Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA) and Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP). Each have their advantages and disadvantages. Let’s look at both of them in-depth now.
Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA)
The TFSA is tax-sheltered account that lets your money grow, as the name suggests, tax-free. You’ll never have to pay income tax on money that you earn in the TFSA, not even when you withdraw the funds. You can hold a variety of investments inside your TFSA, including savings accounts, bonds, stocks, mutual funds and ETFs.
When contributing to the TFSA like any other tax-sheltered account, it’s important to make sure you’re following the rules. There’s a limit to how much money you can contribute to the TFSA each year. In 2019, the TFSA contribution limit is $6,000 and any room that you’re not currently using is carried forward from previous years.
What makes the TFSA great is that it’s super flexible? If your child decides not to go to college or university, you could use the funds towards something else like the down payment on home, a family vacation or whatever else you like.
The one major drawback about the TFSA is that it doesn’t attract the 20 percent government grant, so in most cases you’re better contributing to the RESP first, although the TFSA can be a great place to save for your child’s education if you’ve maxed out their RESP.
Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP)
Unlike the TFSA, which is best described as a multi-purpose savings account, the RESP is an account specifically designed for saving towards your child’s higher education.
The RESP is similar to the TFSA in many ways. You can hold many investment types inside the RESP, including savings accounts, bonds, stocks, mutual funds and ETFs. The investments grow tax-free inside the RESP. (You do have to pay tax when the money is withdrawn, although it’s taxed in the hands of your child.) Since your child usually has little to no income when they’re going to school, they likely won’t have to pay any income tax.
The major advantage of an RESP is that it attracts a 20 percent government grant. That’s the equivalent of a 20 percent risk-free return on your money. Not bad! If you contribute $2,500 per year to your child’s RESP, your child will receive the full $500 Canada Education Savings (CESG).
The RESP also has a lifetime contribution limit of $50,000. While that should be plenty for most, if your child is attending an Ivy League School, $50,000 may not be enough. No matter what account you choose, just know that by helping your child save for school, you’re already doing a great thing to help provide them with a brighter future.
 a parent, you want what’s best for your child. You do that by helping your children in many ways. You teach them how to ride a bike, attend their school recitals and help them save for post-secondary education. While all of these can be considered important life experiences, the last one can seem daunting. Thankfully, you’re not alone.
There are two popular ways to save towards your child’s post-secondary education costs: the Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA) and Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP). Each have their advantages and disadvantages. Let’s look at both of them in-depth now.
Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA)
The TFSA is tax-sheltered account that lets your money grow, as the name suggests, tax-free. You’ll never have to pay income tax on money that you earn in the TFSA, not even when you withdraw the funds. You can hold a variety of investments inside your TFSA, including savings accounts, bonds, stocks, mutual funds and ETFs.
When contributing to the TFSA like any other tax-sheltered account, it’s important to make sure you’re following the rules. There’s a limit to how much money you can contribute to the TFSA each year. In 2019, the TFSA contribution limit is $6,000 and any room that you’re not currently using is carried forward from previous years.
What makes the TFSA great is that it’s super flexible? If your child decides not to go to college or university, you could use the funds towards something else like the down payment on home, a family vacation or whatever else you like.
The one major drawback about the TFSA is that it doesn’t attract the 20 percent government grant, so in most cases you’re better contributing to the RESP first, although the TFSA can be a great place to save for your child’s education if you’ve maxed out their RESP.
Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP)
Unlike the TFSA, which is best described as a multi-purpose savings account, the RESP is an account specifically designed for saving towards your child’s higher education.
The RESP is similar to the TFSA in many ways. You can hold many investment types inside the RESP, including savings accounts, bonds, stocks, mutual funds and ETFs. The investments grow tax-free inside the RESP. (You do have to pay tax when the money is withdrawn, although it’s taxed in the hands of your child.) Since your child usually has little to no income when they’re going to school, they likely won’t have to pay any income tax.
The major advantage of an RESP is that it attracts a 20 percent government grant. That’s the equivalent of a 20 percent risk-free return on your money. Not bad! If you contribute $2,500 per year to your child’s RESP, your child will receive the full $500 Canada Education Savings (CESG).
The RESP also has a lifetime contribution limit of $50,000. While that should be plenty for most, if your child is attending an Ivy League School, $50,000 may not be enough. No matter what account you choose, just know that by helping your child save for school, you’re already doing a great thing to help provide them with a brighter future.

How to Make the Most of the Increased Canada Child Benefit

How much does it cost to raise a child from diapers through braces to high school graduation? According to MoneySense.ca, the average cost of raising a child to 18 years old is nearly $250K. And if you plan to financially support them during their years of post-secondary education, it will be even more costly.
To help encourage couples to have children and to help with the cost of raising a child, the government offers the Canada Child Benefit (CCB). If you’re a parent in receipt of or eligible for the CCB, there’s good news! The government is increasing the amount that parents can receive. Let’s take a closer look at the changes to the CCB and how parents can make the most of them.
Canada Child Benefit Increasing
Beginning in July 2019, the CCB increased. In case you’re a new parent and you’re not familiar with this benefit, the CCB is a tax-free financial boost for families.
Starting in July, the new annual maximum benefit is $6,639 for children under 6 years old and $5,602 per children ages 6 through 17. This adds up to an increase of about 3 percent from current rates or a few hundred dollars on a yearly basis, since 2016.
Not everyone is eligible for the CCB. The more children you have, the more the CCB. However, the more income your family has, the more the CCB is reduced.
Does the CCB sound good so far? If you haven’t already applied and you’re eligible, you can register your child’s application through the CRA’s Automated Benefit Application. However, if you’re a parent who’s behind on your taxes, you’ll need to get caught up first before you’re eligible to start receiving the CCB.
Making the Most of the Extra Money
If you’re eligible for the increase in the CCB, it’s a good idea to be proactive and make a plan for the extra money. That way, you’re more likely to make the most out of it.
A great use of the increase to the CCB is to contribute the extra money to your child’s RESP. An RESP allows you to proactively save for your child’s post-secondary education. Not only does the money you contribute to an RESP grow tax-free, you’re also eligible for a grant of up to 20 percent of whatever you contribute up to a maximum of $500 per year or $7,200 over your child’s lifetime. (And if your family has a qualifying low-income, you may be eligible for the Canada Learning Bond. That means up to an extra $2,000 in your child’s savings over the lifetime of your RESP.)
The easiest way to up the contribution to your child’s RESP is to increase the monthly amount you’re already contributing. If you can increase the contribution amount by $25, $30 or even $50, it can go a long way in providing a brighter financial future for your child!
Contact me at Karen.Wallace@KFF.ca to get your RESP set up to take advantage of the increase in CCB.

Struggling to Contribute to Your Child’s RESP? How Small Savings Can Add Up Over Time

A lot of us would like to save more money, but that’s often easier said than done. We often say that if only we got a raise at work, we’d save more money. The funny thing is, even when we do get a raise at work, instead of saving more money, most of us find new ways to spend it. Why does this happen? Due to a little thing called “lifestyle inflation.” Lifestyle inflation is when you increase your spending when you get a raise at work. What are the side effects of lifestyle inflation? It makes it hard to pay off debt, save for retirement and contribute to your child’s RESP.

There is a misconception out there that we can’t afford to contribute to an RESP, but even if you’re able to save an extra $75 a month, it will add up over time when compounded with government grants. How do you do that without getting a raise? Let’s take a closer look at a little thing called the “latte factor.”

Introducing the Latte Factor

What’s the easiest way to find extra money to contribute to your child’s RESP? It’s not getting a raise at work. It’s making better use of the money you already have.

There’s a term out there you may have heard of called the Latte Factor or Latte Effect. At first glance, you might it has something to do with drinking a lot of lattes. While it could for some people, it’s more about how small daily purchases can really add up. However, when you eliminate them, you can end up with a nice chunk of change. It all comes down to finding an extra $3 per day in savings and investing it.

What does $3 per day mean to you? Saving an extra $3 per day means about $75 per month or $900 per year; not bad and that’s just by saving $3 a day. Imagine if you could save $10 a day or more. That’s when the savings can really add up!

How Do You Save More Money?

So, how do you save more money? That’s the million-dollar question, but saving money is easier than you thought.

Besides the mortgage/rent, for most families the second and third most costly household expenses are food and transportation. If you could shave five or 10 percent off those, the savings may add up to $50 or $100 extra per month.

For example, instead of driving to work and paying for parking every single day, why not bike to work once a week or take public transit. You don’t have to do it every single day, especially when you have to drop off the kids to school or have errands to run, but once in a while won’t kill you.

Likewise, instead of buying your lunch every single day, but cutting it back to two or three times a week, you could easily save yourself $50 or $100 extra a month. These are just a couple examples of how to save.

Your Child Deserves a Brighter Future

If you’re not contributing to your child’s RESP, you’re literally leaving free government money on the table. Small savings each day can add up to a lot over time and even more when invested in an RESP. By coming up with an extra $75 per month, you can take advantage of the RESP and provide your child with a bright future through the gift of higher education.

For more information on your child’s RESP’s contact Karen Wallace here at Knowledge First Financial. Karen is sponsoring our Halloween Party on Friday October 18th! She’s happy to answer any questions you might have at the party about your child’s RESP’s.

Or you can email her at:

Hot Mama Fitness: Workout With Your Kids!

Hot Mama Fit – Moms work out while their kids play! We offer group fitness classes for moms who want a quick, effective and fun work. We welcome all moms, whether you are newly postpartum and looking to get back into fitness or an experienced exerciser!

Hot Mama isn’t just about fitness; it’s about empowering women, building community and embracing family fitness. Mamas often take care of everyone else before themselves. Hot Mama provides a safe, supportive space where they can work out while not worrying about childcare. It’s a bonus that the kids witness firsthand what an amazing, strong role model their mama can be!

Each Hot Mama location offers a variety of classes, from low impact, strength-based workouts to high intensity Cardio Blasts. Don’t worry… Every class can be modified to your current fitness level. We also offer Body Smarts, our 12 week nutrition program designed by a Registered Dietitian and PhD in Exercise Physiology (next session starting the week of September 23rd), Bootylicious Run Group, our super popular 12 week program designed for the beginner to intermediate runner (next session starting Spring 2020) and Screw The Scale, our 8 week fitness education and self-love program (starting in October).

There are 3 locations in Calgary – Calgary SE, Calgary NE- Marlborough and Calgary West Sarcee. Your first week is always FREE to try! Moms who are 8-24 weeks postpartum get four weeks of classes for FREE (2/week) as part of our Postpartum Initiative.

Visit http://hotmamafit.com/to find the location nearest you and email us to get started.

Can My Kids Contribute to their RESPs?

Besides putting a roof over your family’s head and food on the table, one of the best things a parent can do is help their children with the cost of post-secondary education.

Going to college or university isn’t cheap these days. Tuition is going up a lot faster than the rate of inflation. This means that students are graduating with more and more student debt. Having student debt can mean that your adult child could delay important milestones like buying their first home and getting married.

For parents there are a lot of competing financial priorities: paying the mortgage, saving for retirement, contributing to your tax-free savings account and let’s not forget saving for your child’s post-secondary education. That begs the question, let’s say your child has a part-time job, can he or she contribute to their own RESP?

Children Can Contribute to their own RESP

The short answer is, yes, kids can contribute to their own RESP. If your daughter or son has a part-time job, they can put some of their paycheque towards their RESP.

When your child contributes to their own RESP, it’s treated just like any other RESP contribution. It’s eligible for the 20 percent grant from the government. This is essentially free money. You’re leaving free money on the table if you’re not contributing the maximum $2,500 per year in your child’s RESP ($500 per year to be exact).

Teaching Your Kids Financial Literacy Skills

Besides helping reach the maximum $2,500 RESP contribution each year, when your child contributes to their own RESP, it teaches them valuable financial skills.

Many teenagers when they get their first part-time job spend their money on events, concerts and movies. While there’s nothing wrong with your child having some fun with their money, if they’re simply blowing all the money that they make on entertainment, they’re likely not learning anything.

One of the best things you can do for your teenager is teach them financial responsibility before adulthood. When you ask your teenager to contribute to their RESP, it feels more like a partnership. If you as the parent simply pay for all your child’s expenses and contribute to their RESP on your own, they aren’t as likely to value the money that you’ve saved towards their education.

As an example, if a parent saves the entire amount in their child’s RESP, when the child actually attends college or university, they might be more likely to drop courses and may not put in the same effort since it’s not their money. However, if your child worked hard at a part-time job and contributed, too, they’re more likely to put in more of an effort since they have skin in the game, too.

The facts don’t lie. With about half of Canadians living paycheque to paycheque and a lack of financial literacy courses in the school system, asking your child to contribute to their RESP is one of the best things you can do.

Matching Your Child’s Contributions

There are many ways you can do this. One way is to match your child’s contribution. So, if your child can contribute $1,250, you’ll contribute $1,250, too, so you’ll get $2,500 together and can maximize the government grant.

Sit down with your child and come up with an arrangement that works where you’re both on board. When you do this, your teen is more likely to understand and feel motivated to help put money towards their own RESP.

Your child will have more money in their RESP and learn a valuable life lesson. It’s a win-win situation.

For more information, Karen Wallace from Knowledge First Financial would be happy to help!

You can reach her at:

karen_wallace@heritageresp.com

Benefits of Dance: Soul to Sole Dance Company

Why Should Young Children Dance?

There are so many different activities nowadays that parents can put their children into. From organized sports to music lessons and everything else in between, it often makes it difficult for both parents and children to choose. Parents often look for activities that will keep their children active, engaged and something where they can have fun. Dance classes are great for young children and there are many dance studios out there that offer lessons for children as young as one year old. Participating in dance classes can be beneficial for children of all ages!

Some of Our Favorite Benefits of Dance:

  1. Improves Physical Health

Dancing is a great form of physical exercise, and developing a love for dance at an early age can help to motivate children to stay active as they grow into adulthood. Dance classes can increase your child’s flexibility, range of motion, physical strength and stamina and improve their overall cardiovascular health.

  1. Socialization Benefits

Dance is a highly social activity. Dance classes can help children improve their social skills, learn how to work as part of a team, develop a greater sense of trust and cooperation and make new friends which more often than not, develop into lifelong friendships.

  1. Encourages Creativity

Dance encourages children to be more creative and to express themselves in various ways. By encouraging creativity and using their imagination, children learn to build trust, develop effective relationships and learn how to think critically. Early childhood is the best time for the developing creativity and creative problem solving, which in turn will help serve your child for life.

  1. Improved Self Esteem

As children learn and adjust to the various movements and postures that are required in dance, they develop a better sense of their own bodies. As they become more comfortable in their own skin, their confidence and self-esteem also significantly improve. Dance classes can encourage children to foster a more positive attitude and allow them to explore their own self-expression.

Dancing is such an amazing activity for children. It allows them to stay active in such a fun and exciting way! If you are looking to increase your child’s self-esteem, improve their social skills and help them develop great habits for life, enroll them in a dance class at Soul To Sole Dance Company Ltd. today!

Our goal at Soul To Sole Dance Company Ltd. is to provide students with a challenging, exciting and educational experience, while helping them reach their full potential.

Our atmosphere is extremely positive, in which our staff is always willing to go out of their way to provide exceptional instruction, information and service. Students may explore a variety of dance styles and disciplines and learn not only the basic steps within these disciplines, but also explore the history and roots of the art of dance.

We offer many different classes and provide students with superior training in a safe and nurturing environment.

We look forward to welcoming you into our DANCE family and can’t wait to create some amazing memories together!

Soul To Sole Dance Company Ltd. is a place where people of all ages, shapes, sizes and abilities learn to dance and perform. This is a studio where creativity, individuality and self-expression are highly encouraged. We are a community of teachers, students and families who are passionate about the performing arts. Our goal is to create a positive and enjoyable experience for all of our students. We strive to nurture and develop talent, celebrate the achievements of all students and inspire a love and appreciation of all styles of dance and the arts. We are committed to providing a safe and positive environment in which all students can feel empowered, comfortable and free to express themselves.