World Autism Awareness Day

Yesterday was World Autism Awareness Day, but it is being recognized for the entire month of April.

What is World Autism Awareness day?

World Autism Awareness Day is an internationally recognized day on 2 April every year, encouraging Member States of the United Nations to take measures to raise awareness about people with autism throughout the world.

What is Autism?
Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a life-long neurological disorder that affects the way a person communicates and relates to the people and world around them. ASD can affect behaviour, social interactions, and one’s ability to communicate. ASD is a spectrum disorder, which means that while all people with ASD will experience certain difficulties, the degree to which each person on the spectrum experiences these challenges will be different.

Statistics
Research shows that 1 is 68 children are currently diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. It is now the fastest growing and most commonly diagnosed neurological disorder in Canada.

Did you know that right here in Durham region we have a safe park for all?

Ajax resident and autism grandmother Karen Tremblay and Autism Ontario Durham Region worked with the town of Ajax on a plan to provide a safe playground for kids who are prone to wandering or elopement. The park provides a safe and inclusive space for children with all abilities to play.  Click Here for more information and location.

In closing, A few Things People With Autism want you to know:
1) Calling someone “high functioning” is not helpful. Every autistic person has a unique combination of skills and needs.
2) They do not lack empathy. Research shows that this is not the case, but it may be the total opposite.
3) Not all of us can talk, but we all have something to say. We communicate in different ways, you just need to listen to us.
4) We work hard to be part of your world; and we are exhausted

Many events are happening across Canada for the month of April.  Click Here for Autism Ontario events for Durham region and Toronto.

I hope this snippet of information has provided some awareness/education on this misunderstood disorder.

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